The Ancient Culture of Lifehacking

The Ancient Culture of Lifehacking

Escape

Every day is an opportunity to grow, to develop. When this is clear to me, when it is in the forefront – life is a challenge, an adventure.. There is so much we can do with the days blank canvas to develop ourselves. But we don’t do that instead we are mechanical, on automatic pilot.  We spend so much valuable time worrying or afraid, limiting ourselves. Doing the same things, having the same feelings  and hoping that it will change.
Perhaps the most common mechanical manifestation is the role of the victim. We tell ourselves that things are happening to us, that its not us creating them, or allowing them – either things are just happening that  we can’t do anything about -or things we want to happen just can’t.
The historical Buddha was a lifehacker. Lost Coin is part of his hacker lineage. Shakyamuni Buddha – I like to think of him as Sam to underline that he was just like you and me  (the ancient teachers in our lineage said when you say the word Buddha you should wash your mouth out with soap). So Sam took on an incredible set of problems – old age, desease and death and he tried to hack them with all the available means. Eventually he succeeded with a combination of zazen and a method of practice called the eightfold path. But he had to really decide to do it and that he could do it.
The amazing thing is that even if we have been afraid, procrastinating or being the victim it can all change in one moment. We are capable of a complete shift and then what we need is to practice, hack the mechanical patterns – the defaults. Today would be a good day to make that shift. It takes one bold step. That step always happens now.
photo credit: country_boy_shaneCreative Commons License

The Culture of Lost Coin

The Culture of Lost Coin

DNA Molecule display, Oxford University

In developing Lost Coin, what I hope we can do is create a culture.  I believe this is close to what Shakyamuni Buddha wanted to do in his time.  I hope this culture forgoes prejudice and superstition and, instead, relies on what is provable and at the same time is deeply rooted in the humility of what we do not understand.

Toward that end, I believe we can look at science and Zen as two sides of the same Lost Coin.  Through science we can see we are connected to everything.  A human and a tree share a common ancestor.  We have the stuff of stars in our bodies. On the other side, by the experiential and verifiable method of zazen, we see the field of consciousness from which all thoughts and understanding arise.  Science shows us the small transient speck we are in the limitlessness of reality.  Zen reveals the absolute consciousness teach one of us possesses that encompasses everything.
We can build a culture of intelligence and consciousness that reveals our identity with all things. Both science and Zen embrace the unknown rather than simply “making believe” that we understand what we do not. Reason and “no mind” are two valuable parts of the mind- they are the two hands of knowledge. A culture that embraces them both may finally help put an end to the medieval thinking that still exists and be the start of a wondrous journey into our real potential.
Creative Commons License photo credit: net_efekt