London Zen Class

London Zen Class

london 2 hdr

 
 
INTRODUCTION TO ZEN PRACTICE
Join Lost Coin Zen at The Buddhist Society Saturday September 10, 2011
Address: 58 Eccleston Square, London SW1V 1PH Time: 10am – 1pm Price: £15
We will explore the fundamentals of Zen practice based on the famous talks given by renowned Zen teacher Yasutani Roshi (1885-1973). He gave these talks to introduce Zen training to Westerners.
Yasutani Roshi is the Dharma grandfather of Doen Sensei, founder of Lost Coin Zen, an international Zen group that synthesizes the Soto and Rinzai sects of Zen as taught through Yasutani Roshi, Maezumi Roshi and the White Plum Asangha.
This introduction to Zen practice will be led by Patrizia Kojin Nestby, a student of Daniel Doen Silberberg and Lost Coin Zen.
There will be time for practicing Zazen and for questions and answers. You will leave with a good understanding of the basics of Zen practice.
To register for this workshop, email to london@lostcoinzen.com
 
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Where I lived and What I Lived For

Where I lived and What I Lived For

Walden is so peaceful

 
“We must learn to reawaken and keep ourselves awake, not by mechanical aids, but by an infinite expectation of the dawn, which does not forsake us in our soundest sleep. I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor. It is something to be able to paint a particular picture, or carve a statue, and so to make a few objects beautiful: but it is far more glorious to carve and paint the very atmosphere and medium through which we look…”
This essay entitled “Where I lived and What I Lived For” is from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden points to a wonderful koan that I believe we can appreciate as much today as brother Henry did in his time. Tomorrow is Henry David Thoreau’s birthday and though we are not related by blood I feel he is part of our clan. The title “Where I live and What I lived For” is itself the koan and what he says about it is the commentary.
I found this in a copy of Walden – it was one of the last books I gave my father before he died. It was my father’s koan  “Where I lived and What I Lived For” – it is mine as well and I hope you will accept it as a gift to you on Thoreau’s birthday.
It is a marvelous practice to carve and create our own atmosphere, our own life.
To really appreciate our life and death is to carve and create our atmosphere and life. It is Genjokoan – the koan of everyday life.
 
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An Adept

An Adept

 

.TIME FLIES.....................*

An adept  – a warrior is always the subject of her own careful scrutiny. Always asking herself the same questions. Am I really practicing? Am I really doing my best? Am I really giving 110%. Am I really letting go of my prejudices, my rightness, my stuckness, my fear? This is the joy of the way the adept lives  – with commitment and really demanding the very best from herself as often as she can.
The important word in all this, the one that comes up over and over again is really.
Why wouldn’t anyone choose to live with this freedom and power?  The power to make every day of life a joyful challenge.  The answer is no one chooses not to live like this – the enemy makes this choice.
The enemy,  whose name is fear or  inertia, small mindedness – whatever hat it is wearing that day, is very clever. It tells you that it is wisdom, practicality, reasonable caution, maturity. It is whispering in your ear right now as the moments of your life disappear – telling you not to change anything.  It is depriving you of your spirit, your freedom, your courage. It is depriving you of your life
Creative Commons License photo credit: Neal.